How to read a Mind Map®

The best way to start learning how to construct your own Mind Maps® is to study ones that other people have created.

On this Mind Map®, ideas and thoughts are shown as coloured images and key words branching out from a central theme. One of the key benefits of Mind Maps® is that they help you to see how ideas link to each other as well as how they relate to the central theme.

Retirement Speech of Joe
© Jayne Cormie 2004

1. Start in the centre – the image represents the theme/topic of the Mind Map®. The above example is a Mind Map® of Joe’s retirement speech.

2. Start of the main branches at one o’clock (thick curved line connected to the central image). This has a key word printed on it and represents an idea/thought that is linked to the main theme. Think of it as being like a chapter heading in a book. Example, Joe is retiring.

3. Read out from the centre along the branch. These are second and third levels of thought with words and images that are associated with the main branch. Example, Joe is retiring after 32 years working for the company and its a sad day for all in the business.

3. Read out from the centre along the branch till 11 O’clock. These are second and third levels of thought with words and images that are associated with the main branch. Example, Joe is retiring after 32 years working for the company and its a sad day for all in the business.

Continue reading around the Mind Map® until you have read and understand the whole map.

(Sources: Mind Maps® In A Week, J. Smith & S. Morris. Get Ahead, V. North. The Mind Map Book, T. Buzan)
Mind Mapping®, Mind Map® and Radiant Thinking® are registered trademarks of the Buzan organisation. All our Mind Mapping® courses are facilitated by highly qualified and experienced Buzan Licensed Instructors.